September 20 2017

Proof is in the Pudding

The proof is in the pudding. Did you know that proverb actually has a second part to it? William Camden said “All the proof of a pudding is in the eating.” The full quote changes the meaning, but I like the original. To relate, all the proof of an invisible illness is in the experiencing.
Since you cannot experience this for yourself (not that I would wish that on anyone), I am going to paint you a picture. Bear with me if you can; I am about to show my underbelly.
Saturday I woke up with a headache. It happens; it sucks, but I’ve learned ways to handle it and move on. This headache though wasn’t going away. If anything, all of my attempts to alleviate the pain seemed to make it worse. It didn’t seem influenced by sound or light, it just hurt. A radiating pain of the searingly hot variety. I tried to hang but I was snappy and agitated. My brother took the kids so I could try and nap it off. Mind you, internally I was wondering if it had anything to do with my recent blood test/results. Then again, my internal mode is always set to “over-anxious anxiety.”
By the late evening I knew I needed to get up and handle my adult life, but what I did instead was move all of my stuff (Hydro Flask, blanket, Netflix DVD, and phone) from the bedroom to the downstairs couch. Which–for the record–I totally counted as a win. I was up, I was moving, and I was in relative proximity to my brood. Then my stomach started rolling. I felt feverish and the headache was still unrelenting. In the span of a few minutes, my temperature soared, as did my anxiety.
I climbed the stairs and managed to get to the toilet. However, all I could do was crouch down and cry; deep, can’t-breathe-screams-of-agony intermixed with wails of true debilitating despair. I had no idea what my intent was when I got up, but I was driven to move toward the bedroom and when I got there I collapsed on the bed, still screaming and crying. In the background I could hear the boys asking what was wrong with mommy.
I see Jon start to transition from no idea what is going on to action mode. He immediately starts asking me what is wrong, what hurts, and then telling me to take deep breaths. At this point, my entire body was on fire and my head was hurting so bad I was literally wishing it would just explode. My breaths were coming more aggressively making it harder for me to breathe. “Deep breath, deep breath, deep breath,” Jon just kept repeating it over and over, telling me I needed to breathe in and take slow breaths out.
It took a while. The snot was pouring down my face and mixing with my tears making it hard to see, but eventually Jon calmed me enough and I was able to explain that it hurt to breathe, my head was pounding and I couldn’t regulate my temperature.
Jon had me strip down and get into the purposefully freezing cold water of the shower. I was still in pain, probably screaming (and just as likely crying), so I hunkered down on all fours and just shook as the water beat down on my skin. At first the water was nice but then the coldness seeped into my bones, making me shiver in new ways. I tried heating the water but Jon turned it back to cold and told me to drink the cup of Pedialyte. My hair was sopping wet, my face was covered in snot, tears, and drool, and I was doing everything in my power to handle the shock my system was experiencing. I can’t tell you how short or long the “shower” lasted, but I can tell you it felt like an eternity. Jon helped me out of the tub, wrapped me in a towel and held me while I cried into his chest. He whispered, “I won’t let anything happen to you.” I know it sounds crazy, but I believed him. I knew, even while everything was happening, that he truly had only my best interest at heart. He is the one person in the world that has seen the deeply scarred and damaged parts of my soul and still wants to help heal the ugly.
You might think that’s the end of my episode; I mean really, how much can one person handle? But no. After I was dried off, Jon helped get me into bed. He said he shocked my system and I needed to let my core temperature return to normal naturally or all of that would have been for nothing, so I sipped at more Pedialyte (nasty-awful-salty-sweet drink) and tried to keep my shivering to a minimum. (Difficult to do with wet hair, no clothes and a fan on, but I was doing my best to let my body reset.) The headache was thumping terribly, but I was just happy to have stopped crying. Jon was dabbing at my head with a wet washcloth and mother-henning me in the best way possible.
Extreme dehydration sucks.
After my temp started to come back up, and the sips of water seemed to go down smoother, Jon laid down to sleep. Did I mention I hadn’t eaten much since dinner Friday night? Because, other than a few rolls, I don’t know that I ate anything. Which is only truly relevant when I talk about the puking. Oh my gosh, the puking. Basically, it was one extreme to the next, all the while my head was pounding away. It seemed the more I drank, the more I puked. If I took slow sips I would get too impatient with pain and worry and would try to over compensate.
All night, I sipped, I oiled, I medicated, and I even applied Icy-Hot. By morning, I knew Sunday would be a lost day and by that night I knew I would need to call out of work (something I try never to do). I think the part I am struggling with the most is that the kids had to witness the meltdown. I know they are young but I want them to stay young, stay innocent and full of life, spirit, and imagination. I don’t want my illness or my actions to take away from them the innocence of what childhood should be.
Can you relate? Can you see the image of what this illness is? If so, I am sorry.


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Posted September 20, 2017 by in category "Crohn's Disease

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